Meet Edixon

“When I got with my foster mom, and Lutheran too, I never thought that I’d be graduating from high school. And then Lutheran, they believed in me, and they always were there when I need support, the same as my foster parent. From my experience, just support the kids and let them know that you are there for them. Help them, especially when they struggle with something.”

Edixon entered foster care in 2008 after fleeing violence in Honduras.  Here are his thoughts on how his foster mother, Mollie, changed his life.

 

Q: What impact did your foster family or the program have on you?
A: That was huge in fact for me. One was when I get with my foster mom, and Lutheran too, I never thought that I’d be graduating from high school. It was really hard, cause I went to this high school and there were not a lot of Latinos, so there were more American people, so at the same time it was helpful because I learn a lot of English in there, because I didn’t communicate in Spanish with them. And then Lutheran, they believe in me, and they always were there when I need support, the same as my foster parent. One thing – because I hang out a lot on weekend – Mollie was always there like on Fridays – if I have bad grades, I don’t have the right to hang out. Mollie focused me on school – no matter what. This is the priority for you.

Q: How did you feel when you first learned you were going to live with a foster family?
A: It was hard, confusing, make you think a lot cause you don’t know the family, how they going to support you and you don’t know nothing about them and they don’t know a lot about you, too.

Q: What were some of the challenges you had to overcome, and what helped you?
A: One was, when I get here, my first language was Spanish and then I went to a family where they don’t speak Spanish. So I have to learn English and at the time I don’t have good communication with them for the language. Pretty much was forced to learn English cause otherwise how we going to communicate with each other? They were different culture – it was no like the same as your family, you know, because different expected, like different food, different things that they do – it wasn’t the same that I do.

Q: What would you say to someone considering becoming a foster parent with us?
A: For my experience, just support the kids and let them know that you are there for them, for support. Help them, especially when they struggle with something. Trust the new kids – that is hard – [my foster mom] trust me. She say I know you don’t do anything wrong. She talked to me about things. About alcohol and drugs and the affects they can have on you. And also about relationships.

Edixon is now studying at Seattle Central where he is pursuing a degree in Civil Engineering.  He works part-time, gaining skills in the field with a local concrete company.  Mollie continues to be a major support for him.